Physics-Biology interface seminar

Held every second Wednesday at 11am in the moyen amphi at LPS (not LPTMS!) in Orsay, this seminar series aims to be a central forum for the Physics/Biology interface in the south of Paris.

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Other seminars and conferences you might be interested in:

Paris-Saclay Biomechanics seminar - last Thu. of the month in Palaiseau (subscribe to their announcements)
Seminar of the Physical Chemistry Laboratory - in Orsay

Informations for speakers
Past seminars
Contact the organizer


Seminar cancelled: rescheduled for March 13th

Karim Benzerara (Sorbonne Universités, Paris)

Location: Amphi BLANDIN du LPS de la Faculté des Sciences d’Orsay (Bâtiment 510)

From cells to tissue: A continuum model of epithelial mechanics

Philippe Marcq (Institut Curie, Paris)

SPECIAL LOCATION

A continuum model of epithelial tissue mechanics is formulated using cellular-level mechanical ingredients and cell morphogenetic processes, including cellular shape changes and cellular rearrangements. This model incorporates stress and deformation tensors, which can be compared with experimental data. Focusing on the interplay between cell shape changes and cell rearrangements, we elucidate dynamical behavior underlying passive relaxation, active contraction-elongation, and tissue shear flow. Extensions of the model allow to incorporate additional ingredients, such as cell division, cell death, and cell motility.

Location: LPTMS, salle 201, 2ème étage, Bât 100, Campus d'Orsay

Mathilde Badoual (IMNC, U. Paris-Sud)

Location: Moyen Amphi, Building 510, Université Paris-Sud Orsay

Formation of intracellular amorphous carbonates by bacteria

Karim Benzerara (Sorbonne Universités, Paris)

Living cells can sustain out-of-equilibrium states in a given environment by consuming free energy. The formation of some intracellular mineral phases provides some examples of this. Here I will review some of the work we have performed in the last years to describe and understand how some cyanobacteria, which are abundant photosynthesizing bacteria appeared several billions years ago at the surface of the Earth, manage to form intracellular amorphous carbonates. I will show the environmental conditions under which they catalyze this process, detail the methodologies (including cryo-TEM and spectroscopies) we used to characterize these phases and finally address the involved (bio)molecular mechanisms. The question of the selective advantage(s) provided by this process, if any, will be asked. The implications for basic and applied research will also be addressed. Overall, this talk should convince you that a highly interdisciplinary work is crucially needed to globally understand this intracellular biomineralization process.

Location: Moyen Amphi, Building 510, Université Paris-Sud Orsay

Stefan Karpitschka (MPI Göttingen)

Location: Moyen Amphi, Building 510, Université Paris-Sud Orsay